10 Awesome Facts About Highways


 Ten Awesome Facts About Highways.

1. The longest interstate highway is I-90, running 3,020.5 miles long between Boston and Seattle. The second longest is I-80, which covers the 2,907 miles between New York City and San Francisco. The shortest interstate route segment is I-95 in the District of Columbia which is 0.11 miles long.

Source: MileSurfer Interstate Highway Trivia Page

2. The only state without any interstate routes is Alaska.

Source: MileSurfer Interstate Highway Trivia Page

3. The oldest interstate segments actually predate the establishment of the Interstate System. An early example is a portion of the Grand Central Parkway in Queens, New York, which was opened to traffic in July 1936 and later was incorporated into the Interstate System as I-278.

Source: Interstate Highway System Trivia, infoplease.com

4. I-95 traverses the most states, passing through Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, District of Columbia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine.

Source: Interstate Highway System Trivia, infoplease.com

5. Before it was called Route 66, and long before it was even paved in 1926, this corridor was traversed by the National Old Trails Highway, one of the country’s first transcontinental highways. For three decades before and after World War II, Route 66 earned the title “Main Street of America” because it wound through small towns across the Midwest and Southwest.

Source: Route 66, Road Trip USA

6. In 1984, Route 66 was officially decommissioned. The old route is now designated Historic Route 66.

Source: Route 66, Road Trip USA

7. Even numbered interstates travel east-west (I-4, I-8, I-10, I-12, etc.), while odd-numbered interstates travel north-south (I-5, I-15, I-17, I-19, etc.)

Source: All About Interstate Highways, Interstate Guide

8. The Interstate Highway System shield was designed by Richard Oliver of Texas as a black and white shield; the red, white, and blue version was approved by the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) in 1957. It is trademarked.

Source: All About Interstate Highways, Interstate Guide

9. Installing roundabouts in place of traffic signals can reduce the likelihood and severity of rear-end crashes by removing the incentive for drivers to speed up as they approach green lights and by reducing abrupt stops at red lights.

Source: Roundabouts Q&A, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Highway Loss Data Institute

10. Numerous crash avoidance technologies are available in passenger vehicles in the United States, though they are currently rare. These technologies include front crash prevention systems, adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning systems, blind spot detection systems, parking assist systems, curve adaptive headlights, fatigue warning systems, and antilock brakes.

Source: Crash Avoidance Technologies Q&A, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Highway Loss Data Institute


Aaron Mack
Fast Forward: Volume 3 Issue 2 - Highway