Ten Facts About Maritime


Graphical image interworking the words ‘Ten Facts About Maritime’.

1. The U.S. maritime industry consists of 1,000 harbor channels; 25,000 miles of inland and coastal waterways; 360 deep and shallow water ports; 1,900 cargo terminals; 460,000 miles of oil pipeline; 18,000 bridges; 240 locks; 97,000 aids to navigation; and 12,400 miles of coastline.

Source: Maritime Transportation Facts for Seaperch, Seaperch

2. The U.S. marine transportation industry employs approximately 8 million Americans, including 12,000 captains, mates and vessel pilots 15,000 sailors, and 7,000 vessel engineers.

Source: Maritime Transportation Facts for Seaperch, Seaperch

3. The U.S. marine transportation system is a complex and diverse network of waterways, ports, and intermodal landside connections. The system includes navigable waterways, vessels, bulk oil transfer facilities, ports, terminal, channels, locks, dams, shipyards, rail yards, vessel repair facilities, recreational marinas and trained staff that operates and maintains the entire infrastructure.

Source: Early History of Water-based Transportation, Water Encyclopedia

4. Since World War II, approximately 95% of all military equipment and material sent to combat and crisis areas was transported by ships.

Source: Early History of Water-based Transportation, Water Encyclopedia

5. Shipping is cheap. For example, rather than fillet its own fish, it is cheaper for Scotland to ship its cod 10,000 miles to China to be filleted and then returned to Scotland.

Source: 10 Fascinating Facts About the Hidden Industry that Touches 90% of What You Own, Fast Company

6. The 360 commercial ports in the U.S. took in international goods worth $1.73 trillion in 2011.

Source: 10 Fascinating Facts About the Hidden Industry that Touches 90% of What You Own, Fast Company

7. Only 5% of the containers shipped to U.S. ports are physically inspected.

Source: Ten Legitimately Fascinating Facts About the Shipping Industry

8. The largest container ship can carry 15,000 boxes, which would hold 746 million bananas.

Source: Ten Legitimately Fascinating Facts About the Shipping Industry

9. In 2014, U.S. coastal ports accounted for 26% of the nation's $17.4 trillion economy.

Source: Maritime – Anchored in the World’s GDP, CIT

10. As it relates to maritime law, the Jones Act refers to federal statute 46 U.S.C. Sec. 883. The Jones Act prohibits any foreign built or foreign flagged vessel from engaging in coastwise trade within the United States.

Source: The Jones Act, the Maritime Law Center


Erin Skoog
Fast Forward: Volume 3 Issue 6 – Maritime & Rail