10 Neat Facts About Public Transit


Graphic of a bus with the words ‘10 neat facts about public transit’ worked into the image.

1. A two-person household can save, on average, more than $9,394 a year by downsizing to one car.

Source: Dump the Pump Transit Facts, American Public Transportation Association

2. The average household spends 17.5 cents of every dollar on transportation, 94% of which goes to buying, maintaining, and operating cars. Transportation costs represent the largest expenditure after housing.

Source: Facts at a Glance, publictransportation.org

3. It is estimated that every $10 million of capital investment in public transportation yields $30 million in increased business sales; additionally, every $10 million of operating investment in public transportation yields $32 million in increased business sales.

Source: Frequently Asked Questions, transitfacts.org

4. A single person using mass transit instead of driving their car would save an average of 200 gallons of fuel per year.

Source: Frequently Asked Questions, transitfacts.org

5. An estimated 13,000 jobs are supported by every $1 billion invested in public infrastructure.

Source: Grow America, United States Department of Transportation

6. In 2013, U.S. transit agencies operated approximately 128,500 transit vehicles, 12,746 miles of track, and 149 lane miles of bus rapid transit. U.S. transit agencies also serve 5,017 rail and bus stations.

Source: Grow America, United States Department of Transportation

7. A bus with as few as seven passengers is more fuel-efficient than the average single-occupant auto used for commuting.

Source: The Environmental Benefits of Riding Public Transit, Delaware Department of National Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC)

8. The fuel efficiency of a fully-occupied train car is 15 times greater than that of the average commuter's single-occupant auto.

Source: The Environmental Benefits of Riding Public Transit, Delaware Department of National Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC)

9. Buses are safer than passenger vehicles. A 2011 NTSB study found the bus occupant fatality rate was 45 deaths per 100,000 accidents compared with 251 deaths per 100,000 accidents for passenger car occupants.

Source: Bus crashes in the United States: What does the research say?, Journalist’s Resource

10. A survey of Americans aged 65 and older found that non-drivers take 15% fewer trips to the doctor, 59% fewer shopping trips and restaurant visits, and 65% fewer trips for social, family, and religious activities than those using an individual vehicle. Public transportation is a way for these non-drivers (particularly low-income seniors and disabled individuals) to gain access to important services and activities that improve public health, such as healthcare appointments and basic shopping, banking, education, and employment opportunities.

Source: 6 Health Benefits of Public Transportation, TransLoc


Erin Skoog
Fast Forward: Volume 3 Issue 4 – PPublic & Active Transportation