10 Neat Facts About Aviation


Graphical image of a plane taking off. The text “Ten Neat Facts about Aviation” is worked into the image.

1. An average of 61,000 people are airborne over the United States during any given hour.

Source: Flying Fun Facts, info@kidsinflight.org

2. The windows in an airport control tower must be tilted out at exactly fifteen degrees from the vertical to minimize reflections from both inside and outside the control tower.

Source: Aviation Fact Generator, Discovery

3. Every day, there are approximately 200,000 flights throughout the world.

Source: 24 Fun Facts About Aviation, Surprise Ride

4. A plane’s life is measured in the number of times it undergoes pressurization. Every time it’s pressured, stress is caused on the fuselage, which adds up to tiny cracks that can’t be repaired.

Source: 24 Fun Facts About Aviation, Surprise Ride

5. Australian Airline Qantas is the world’s second oldest airline, established in 1920.

Source: 25 Aviation Facts You Never Knew, Flight Centre

6. An aircraft takes off or lands every 37 seconds at Chicago O’Hare’s International Airport.

Source: 25 Aviation Facts You Never Knew, Flight Centre

7. A Boeing 747 is made up of six million parts.

Source: Top 10 Interesting Facts About Aviation, Baltic Aviation Academy

8. The engine of a Boeing 747 weighs almost 9,500 pounds and costs about $8 million.

Source: Top 10 Interesting Facts About Aviation, Baltic Aviation Academy

9. Food tastes different under cabin pressure. Turns out that our ability to perceive salty tastes is weakened by the cabin pressure.

Source: 13 Random Aviation Facts, Spartan College of Aeronautics and Technology

10. We usually feel most comfortable when the humidity in the air around us is about 40 to 70 percent. In an aircraft cabin it falls to about 20 percent. It is common to suffer from dry eyes (which can cause serious problems for contact lens wearers) and a sore or dry throat and nose.

Source: What Happens to Your Body When You Fly and How to Beat the Pain, Telegraph United Kingdom


Erin Skoog
Fast Forward: Volume 2 Issue 7 – Aviation