Regional Workforce Development Centers Plan for the Future


Map of the United States blocked off into the different Workforce Center regions.

All five of the Regional Transportation Workforce Development Centers have special areas of emphasis. These areas are going to be the Centers’ main focus over the next few years as they work to create a unique array of resources and contacts that can be used nationally. In the videos below, the amazing directors of each Workforce Center discuss their plans for the future.

Midwest

Theresa Adams, director of the Midwest Center identifies its big focus on STEM careers, transportation infrastructure—design, construction, operations, and maintenance—as well as the implementation of apprenticeship programs. Because the Midwest Center includes the Great Lakes, it will also focus on careers related to ports and inland waterways.

 “Teresa Adams, director, Midwest Regional Workforce Development Center.”

Click a button to watch a interview with Teresa Adams.



Northeastern

As we move towards the future, the field of transportation needs to change. Indeed, it has already begun to change, and Director Glenn McRae and the Northeastern Center are working towards staying on the front edge of those changes. From helping draw students into the transportation industry to reducing the use of petroleum in transportation, the Northeastern Center is looking to grow.

“Glenn McRae, director, Northeastern Regional Workforce Development Center.”

Click a button to watch a interview with Glenn McRae.



Southeastern

Stephanie Ivey, director of the Southeastern Center, declares its focus on women in transportation, freight (truck, rail, and logistics), and helping former military servicemen and veterans transition to the workforce after their service ends. She says these topics have already been the Southeastern Center’s areas of focus, but now they wish to build them into a national focus and broaden their knowledge.

“Stephanie Ivey, director, Southeastern Regional Workforce Development Center.”

Click a button to watch a interview with Stephanie Ivey.



Southwestern

How do you find a point of commonality between California and Texas, as well as a half dozen more southwestern states? Tom O’Brien, director of the Southwest Center had to do exactly that and discovered one key point of commonality: all eight states are gateways, connected to several major transportation corridors. He also discusses the Center’s goal to gather resources on ITS management, traffic management, language learning and digital literacy.

“Tom O’Brien, director, Southwestern Regional Workforce Development Center.”

Click a button to watch a interview with Tom O'Brien.



Western

Progress takes many shapes and comes in many forms, and sometimes requires a unique melding of minds in order to come to fruition. Steve Albert, director of the Western Center, discusses how the Western Region is changing and how his Center intends to stay on the leading edge of that change.

“Steve Albert, director, Western Regional Workforce Development Center.”

Click a button to watch a interview with Steve Albert.





Erin Skoog
Fast Forward: Volume 2 Issue 4 – Pipeline